Monday, May 22, 2017

Chingri macher bora...

chingrir bora, shrimp balls

Who doesn't like fresh juicy sweet shrimps? So when I found some in the market few days back, didn't take long to buy a bagful. I wanted to keep it simple to enjoy the flavorful shrimps to the fullest. I was juggling with different recipes, finally an easy shrimp balls recipe came to my mind. It is a tweaked version of a traditional Bengali style shrimp ball recipe.

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Macher dimer bora...

Macher dimer bora (fish roe fritters)

Bengalis are known for their inclination towards fish. A Bengali meal is incomplete without fish in it. No part of the fish is thrown out, be it the head or the gut or the bones. Different dishes are prepared using different parts of the fish. Mach er dim or fish roe is no exception and considered a delicacy in Bengali cuisine.

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Saak bhaja...

note saak bhaja

Saak or leafy greens are integral part of Bengali cuisine. From simple saute, stir fry to complex chochori (mish-mash with various vegetables) are part of everyday food. The leafy greens are not only delight for the tastebuds, these are rich in nutrients.

Friday, April 28, 2017

Baby potatoes with coriander pesto...

With the heat index increasing everyday it's exhausting to be in the kitchen for longer duration to prepare elaborate dishes. Simple rice, lentils, thin fish curries are what I'm making mostly these days. Other than lunch and dinner, the lunch boxes for school and office require a good planning. With the kid enrolled in a morning school I hardly have 30-40 mins to prepare for the boxes. So I plan accordingly and make myself ready with half the work done before hand. Today I'm going to share one of such recipes, that I prepare for my kid's lunch box. A very easy and quick recipe, which not only great for lunch boxes but also as a starter for your next party.

Friday, April 21, 2017

Plantain Kofta Curry..

Kanchkolar kofta, no onion no garlic, vegan recipe


As summer steps in to our life with all the heat, humidity and all my favorite vegetables vanish from the market, the biggest concern becomes what to cook. I think that's an eternal question for all who are in charge of the kitchen. Though summer has its own bounty of offering in terms of seasonal vegetables, the long stretch of summer we experience in this part of the world makes you run out of choice to cook something new. Add to this in a sub-tropical country like ours everyday household work turns tiresome and difficult, specially working in front of the oven in the kitchen.

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Sojne phool (Moringa flowers)...

posto diye sojne phool

Moringa is a seasonal flower with many health benefits and immunity boosting components. Moringa trees are very common in India and all the parts of the tree from leaf, pods, flowers are used as food. In a Bengali household the pods (drumsticks) are eaten throughout the year and it is more like a ritual to eat moringa flowers or Sojne phool (as we call it in Bengali) during the on set of Spring. As a kid when I used to question about eating those flowers, my parents have always answered that eating moringa flowers prevent chicken pox. I don't know whether it is scientifically proven or not but as I grow up I also follow the same routine of having moringa flowers during this time of the year. And I'm quite fond of this seasonal flower and wait for this bounty of nature which is only available for a very limited time period.

Saturday, January 14, 2017

Rangalur bhaja puli..

rangalur puli pithe, poush parbon

Today I wish you all a happy Makar Sankranti. A harvesting festival, Makar Sankranti is also the oldest solstice festival, when Sun enters the zodiac sign Capricorn or Makar. So the name of this festival actually means the movement of Sun to Capricorn. During this time sun starts to move towards Northern hemisphere, making the days longer and warmer, marking end of winter and beginning of spring. From mid-December all the holy or auspicious activities are  prohibited among Hindus. Makar Sankranti also marks the beginning of auspicious activities. This particular festival is celebrated on a fixed date, 14th of January, and celebrated all around India majorly as a harvesting festival. Different parts of India celebrate this auspicious day under different names, Uttarayan, Lohri, Pongal, Poush Parbon etc.